Eve Aschheim

Eve Aschheim: "Drawings & Photograms

June 11, 2011 – July 31, 2011

Press Release | Images | Essay | Resume

PRESS RELEASE

Some Walls is pleased to present "Drawings & Photograms" by New York artist Eve Aschheim June 11, 2011– July 31, 2011.

Eve Aschheim’s approaches to image-making—drawings, photograms, and paintings—concern line and light, interior and exterior space, rhythm and pattern, and gesture and a sense of play conveyed using each medium’s unique processes and material. As a single body of work, Aschheim’s luminous, shimmering, intimate drawings and photograms evoke architectural and natural space, and affirm the value of the handmade, constructed, and seen. Each resulting image captures the presence and process of emotion, searching, and thinking; for the viewer, looking at the images provokes feeling, exploration, and thought. Aschheim’s assembled and constructed images retain a semingly contradictory sense of vulnerability, openness, and surprise.

Eve Aschheim is Senior Lecturer at the Visual Arts Program at Princeton University.

Recent solo exhibitions include: Galleri Magnus Aklundh, Lund, Sweden; Galerie Inga Kondeyne, Berlin; and Larry Becker Contemporary Art, Philadelphia.

Collections include: Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University; Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; and The Lannan Foundation, Santa Fe, NM.

Some Walls is a curatorial and writing art project in a private home in Oakland, California. Some Walls is open by appointment only. View the exhibition online at somewalls.com. To schedule a visit, or for more information, please contact Chris Ashley at info@somewalls.com.

Previous exhibitions at Some Walls:

 

IMAGES

 

ESSAY

Eve Aschheim’s approaches to image-making—drawings, photograms, and paintings—concern line and light, interior and exterior space, rhythm and pattern, and gesture and a sense of play conveyed using each medium’s unique processes and material. As a single body of work, Aschheim’s luminous, shimmering, intimate drawings and photograms evoke architectural and natural space, and affirm the value of the handmade, constructed, and seen. Each resulting image captures the artist’s presence and process of emotion, searching, and thinking; for the viewer, looking at the images provokes feeling, exploration, and thought. Aschheim’s assembled and constructed images retain a seemingly contradictory sense of vulnerability, openness, and surprise.

The drawings—mixed media on pad-size Mylar, which provides a background of frosted translucency—are additive: marks build up, overlap and layer, echo each other or are positioned in contrast. They may be covered, erased, or moved and redefined before finally set in place. Drawing is the search for a way to depict and describe, a kind of translation or transliteration from something one sees, knows, imagines, strives towards, or stumbles across into marks, gestures, forms, or fields. But in the end, a drawing is neither the thing nor idea one works from or towards; drawn space is its own real and primary space. As obvious as this sounds, it’s worth repeating that a drawing exists as only itself; it is not something else. Aschheim’s drawings—lines and marks arranged and composed—gather or scaffold into perspective-based relationships of tension and harmony. While the image may reference space or form we think we know, the depicted place is unique, a new site to encounter.

In contrast to the drawings, Aschheim’s photograms—a process by which objects are laid on photo paper which is exposed to light—contain a different sense of light, depth, and focus. Some photograms are made using the drawings on Mylar as a negative, which allow enough light through to expose the photo paper, ultimately a kind of printmaking. The compositions of many other photograms, however, are achieved as arrangements, almost like sculpture or relief captured as a final, flattened, printed image. Initially, because these photograms are made with real objects placed on or near the photo paper, we recognize that it is a silhouetted photo of real things. While a photogram is finally itself, too, it also has a certain and undeniable relationship to the objects used to make it, things obviously not hand drawn such as coils, disks and rings, and translucent balls and sections of cylinder. The depicted photographic volume, perspective, or layering renders the arrangement’s depth of field in and out of focus, and is a record of the actual objects once position on the photo paper. Unlike the drawings’ constructed space, the photogram references an atmospheric, actual three-dimensional space.

The two bodies of work share certain linear qualities, but work in opposite directions. While the drawings work from abstraction towards realism, the photograms work from realism towards abstraction. In the drawings, despite the abundance of lines, there is a striking sense of how sunlight shining on a building can momentarily erase lines and dissolve edges. The marks are present, on the surface, but describe form and depth. In the photograms, depicted space is actually quite shallow, like a picture box, and unlike the drawings, tends towards flattening. Yet in all of the images, we sense both intuition and reason at work, alternately hesitant and assured, in the moment, open and keenly aware.

Reflecting on the experience of looking at Aschheim’s images in these two mediums—and thorough looking is a complex enterprise involving visual, physical, intellectual, emotional, and psychological engagement—one notes, despite their outward differences, consistent qualities in her work. Characteristics emerge and are noticeably sustained: contrasting black and white (though the drawings sometimes contain hints of color, the basic read is dark and light); a marked sense of bright light and exposure; interior and exterior architectural structure and space; natural space, both open and more closed; structures rarely in complete stasis but instead either in the middle of being erected, unassembled, or collapsing. From this several themes emerge: the tenuous process and intimacy of image-making; the fragility of the spaces and environments around us; how qualities of light change and effect what we see; the slippery relationship between abstraction and representation; and how our shifting points of view can obscure and clarify. Despite its smallish size, Aschheims’s art activates for us large-scale experience and recognition of feelings and ideas.

Chris Ashley
Oakland, CA
June 2011

RESUME

Eve Aschheim (See artist’s page at Lori Brookstein Fine Arts for a complete and current resume)

  • Born 1958, New York, NY
  • Senior Lecturer at the Visual Arts Program, Princeton University
  • Recent solo exhibitions include: Galleri Magnus Aklundh, Lund, Sweden; Galerie Inga Kondeyne, Berlin; and Larry Becker Contemporary Art, Philadelphia.
  • Collections include: Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University; Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; and The Lannan Foundation, Santa Fe, NM.

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